Children’s Homes

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Welcome Home

What is home?

Home is a place where you feel safe; a place you experience love, and are known.

Home is a place where you learn and grow.

This is the environment we cultivate at each home. They are NOT orphanages, they are homes. 

Before I came to the children’s home…

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"The milkman raped me. Everyone knew I was living alone with my younger brother and sister for weeks at a time while my dad was looking for work."

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"I came to the children's home because my dad tried to poison me after my mom died."

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"I did not eat, my clothes were torn, I did not own shoes.

I was alone."

Coming Home

When a child comes into a Chariots for JBP_2299Hope children’s home they become part of a family. They are given shelter, nutritious food, clothing, and medical care. The staff pours into them, learning who they are as a person, caring for not only physical needs, but also their social, emotional, and spiritual needs. For many, this is the first time in their lives they have felt safe.

A Day in a Children’s Home

The children are early to rise, even before the sun sometimes but by the sound of their voices singing and talking together, you would think it was the middle of the day.  After breakfast, they walk to a nearby school.  The children return home for lunch or the children’s home will make arrangement with the school to prepare lunch for them.  After their one-hour lunch break, they return to school until late afternoon.  Once they arrive home, there are bathing, washing their clothes and of course, playing together.  Dinner is served in the dining hall and then the children gather for evening devotions and study time before climbing into their beds.

On Sundays, the staff and children attend a local church together.  The children usually participate in the choir, Sunday school or children’s programs known as battalion for boys and cadets for girls.

It is a routine that holds true for most months out of the year, except for April, August and December when the children do not have school.  Their “summer vacation” is spread out in-between the three terms of the school year.  During these months the children take time to visit their elderly grandma or other relatives.  If a child does not have relatives to visit, they remain at the children’s home with the people who have become family to them.

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